SA to ban the advertising of life-saving vaping technology

The SA government has recently announced a ban on the advertising of vaping products, despite their potential to significantly reduce the active and passive harm of tobacco.

Taking on the recommendations of a 2016 Select Committee, the SA government is seeking to “regulate” vaping in order to “prohibit the sale to children.” However, the decision to ban the advertising and usage of vaping in enclosed areas is throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Not only will it do little to encourage the 15.7% of South Australian adolescents to quit smoking, it will have the unintended consequence of increasing smoking among younger people.

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Legalise nicotine vaping as a harm reduction solution for tobacco smoking

Originally published on Online Opinion

By Satyajeet Marar

The 7th WHO Conference of the Parties (COP7) is coming soon to sunny Delhi, India and on the agenda for the 180 odd countries and international associations will be the spectre of tobacco.

We’ve known about the full devastation of tobacco for decades now. We know that it is one of the most potent carcinogens in the world. We also know that it is also one of the world’s most lucrative drugs… for governments – a veritable coughing and sputtering cash cow.

But at a time when it is costing our public healthcare system millions of dollars and killing many Australians despite our best efforts to tax it and to replace its labelling with edgy pictures of decomposing organ tissue, it is time to consider any practical harm-reduction alternative that has proven its effectiveness.

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BREAKING: Australia Supporting Attack On Media Freedom, Transparency

In a shocking attack on fundamental concepts of media freedom and government accountability, the Australian Delegation at the World Health Organisation’s WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Meeting currently under way in Delhi voted to eject all journalists and observers from the room, so that negotiations could be conducted in secret without any public scrutiny.

This meeting, partially funded by Australian taxes, and costing millions, is expected to call for further regulation of life-saving tobacco harm reduction technologies, in a move many say is designed to protect government cigarette tax revenues.

As discussions were going on, in a move fully supported by the Australian delegation, journalists wanting to report on proceedings were physically removed from the room by security:

The United Nations, under which the WHO falls, has consistently proclaimed its support for press freedom, with outgoing Secretary Ban Ki Moon stating “I urge all Governments, politicians, businesses and citizens to commit to nurturing and protecting an independent, free media. Without this fundamental right, people are less free and less empowered. With it, we can work together for a world of dignity and opportunity for all.”

So it is particularly disgraceful that the United Nations is refusing to apply this rule to itself.

 

But that’s not all – the FCTC then started blocking journalists on Twitter. Not content with refusing them access to the negotiations, they are now engaging on a vicious campaign of blocking anyone from following them!

This is a meeting funded by Australian taxes.  Our taxpayers have a right to know how our money is being spent and it is a shameful disgrace that our government has acted to suppress transparency, accountability, and freedom of the press.