“Let’s Make Driving Illegal” said the QLD Katter Party

By Henry Innis

At some stage, you’ve got to call bullshit on the Bob Katter party. Not only does the ‘Force from the North’ still literally live in the stone age, but they’ve now decided they’d like to send us back to the legislative equivalent.

It all started in September 2015 when “all round good bloke” Rob (not to be confused with Bob) figured he’d introduce a bill to see Uber drivers penalised with demerit points. His logic? “Our taxi drivers are small business owners… who have followed each and every one of the regulations”.

Hang on a minute there, mates.

This bloke is literally justifying proposing a law to further support people who obey the law. Rather than think “gee is our economy changing?” Rob Katter would rather us have literally no progress, ever.

“I will not see another industry slaughtered by deregulation”, he says. Well, we suppose Mr Katter doesn’t want IKEA furniture, lego or any form of imported good ever.

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Of course, you’d think that they’d at least be able to get the legislation right. But on April 21 they passed legislation not only upping the fines and broadening the definition of “pre-booked passenger services”, but they accidentally made all pre-booked services illegal.

You really couldn’t make this up if you tried.

The LNP seems to have (quietly) supported this too. QLD opposition Transport guy, Scott Emerson, may win the crown for Most Thoroughly Illiberal Statement Ever Made when his justification for such a bill was “We have issued more than $170,000 in fines to 62 drivers”. C’mon Scott, you can do better, we’re sure. And do something about that hair.

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To cap it off, Jim Pearce, supposed “union advocate” is no longer all about listening to his constituents it appears. The Queensland Government not only got flooded with complaints, but they appeared to be deciding that no, we don’t want to listen to our constituents, as they’re wrong. So they found a way to block all the Uber emails.

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It’s a sad day when our representatives deem that we’re no longer worth listening to. But then again, we all know what happens when they ignore us for too long, don’t we?

trump 2016

 

Media Release: Unprecedented Assault on Democracy and Freedom of Political Communication.

22 April 2016

Media Release: Unprecedented Assault on Democracy and Freedom of Political Communication.

The Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance today condemned the Queensland government for an unconstitutional breach of freedom of political communication and an assault on representative democracy. This follows a statement by Queensland Legislative Assembly Speaker The Hon Peter Wellington that the QLD Parliament has blocked all emails in support of ridesharing from being delivered to Queensland MPs.

“The unprecedented decision by the Queensland Legislative Assembly to block Queenslanders from contacting their elected representatives is an assault on the very principles of representative democracy” said Tim Andrews, Executive Director of the Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance.

“To prevent constituents from contacting their MP in support of a policy is an absolute disgrace. These actions demonstrate the hubris of the Queensland government, and the contempt in which they hold the people of Queensland. In addition, this is a flagrant violation of the Constitutional provisions on freedom of political communication and would be successfully challenged in the High Court – at great expense to QLD taxpayers.

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From Mr Jim Pearce MP himself

“In a statement to the Legislative Assembly, Jim Pearce MP, Member for Mirani said he did not want to hear from his constituents because he “was trying to have a bit of relaxation” while in the Chamber. If Mr Pearce wants to “have a bit of relaxation” and not be bothered the residents of his electorate, he should find another line of work – a decision the voters in his electorate will be happy to make for him at the next election.

“This is the latest example this week of policymaking on the run by the QLD government descending into farce. From rejecting the calls of consumers to open up ridesharing to accidentally making hire cars and buses illegal, to now refusing to listen to the concerns of their voters, the QLD government has demonstrated itself unfit to govern.

“Today’s unconstitutional and undemocratic actions have cemented the Queensland’s government as an international laughing stock. They should apologise and remove the ban before any further damage is done”

MEDIA CONTACT:

Tim Andrews Executive Director Australian Taxpayers’ Alliance

(m) 0434064934

(e) tandrews@taxpayers.org.au

(w) www.taxpayers.org.au

The Biggest Pro-Liberty Event In The Asia Pacific Region!

I am delighted to invite all Menzies House readers to attend the 4th ALS Friedman Conference! Held in Sydney on May 13-15 at the award-winning Aerial Function Centre, the Friedman Conference is the largest free market conference in the Asia-Pacific Region tackling the biggest economic and policy challenges facing Australia.

With over 300 participants, 8 international special guests, and 35 presenters from politics, business, universities, think tanks, and activist groups, this is one conference you do not wish to miss! Topics to be discussed include Industrial Relations reform, tax reform, the regulatory challenges to businesses, the 2016 Commonwealth Budget, and many more.

As a special offer, Menzies House readers are entitled to a 15% discount on the standard conference price by using the coupon code: ATA! 

Conference speakers include:

*North Korean escappee, activist and best-selling author Yeonmi Park
*Former French Cabinet Minister Herve Novelli
*NSW Finance Minister Dom Perrottet
*Professor Chris Lewis, Director Centre for Labour Market Research, University of Canberra
*Former Human Rights Commissioner Tim Wilson
*Senators James Paterson, David Leyonhjelm and Bob Day
*Chris Berg and Simon Brehney from the IPA
*Professor Sinclair Davidson from RMIT University
*John Osborn from the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry
*Matt Barrie, CEO, Freelancer.com

And many more!

For a full program and speaker list please visit www.friedman16.org.

A full conference package entitles you to the Friday Night Pre-Conference reception and launch of Chris Berg’s new book at the Hard Rock Cafe overlooking Darling Harbour, 2 days of conference, tea, coffee, delicious lunches,  a 3 course meal with drinks for the Gala Dinner and Award Presentation with keynote speaker Matt Barrie, CEO of Freelancer.com, and aSunday evening post-conference movie night.

As someone who believes in free enterprise, and a prosperous society, I hope you will be able to join the 2016 Friedman Conference for what shall be a truly historic weekend!

To register, please visit www.friedman16.org. We look forward to seeing you there!

How Tax Havens Help Us All

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Tax havens reduce poverty and help average and below income earners, argues Mark Hornshaw:

Tax is the price we pay for failing to build a civilised society. The greater the level of taxation, the greater the degree to which the brute force of confiscation has supplanted voluntary and peaceful interaction. So from that point of view, a tax haven is like a safe house, a Sherwood Forest, so to speak, where honest people can band together to shield themselves from the depredations of the greedy Prince and his cronies (see note below).

If you want to be a bit softer on governments than that, then tax havens can be seen as interjurisdictional tax competition. If governments want to attract businesses to set up headquarters in their territory, some may boast a nice climate, or an educated workforce, or an enclave of high tech suppliers and partners. But the governments of some smaller and poorer nations can offer none of those, and can only ‘compete on price’ in the form of lower taxes. By supporting tax havens, global companies are helping to close the gap between rich countries and developing countries. Meanwhile those who oppose tax havens are attempting to cartelise the tax collecting powers of large nations, by thuggishly forcing out the competition from smaller nations.

But for the average tax payer, that all seems a bit aloof and moralistic. You might be thinking “surely tax havens only serve rich people and big corporations, so why should I be concerned?”

Well I would argue that average or below average income earners benefit a lot more from tax havens than most people realise. Continue reading